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Movie Reviews
8 Mile
(Eminem, Kim Basinger / R / 88 mins / Universal)

Overview:A young white rapper from Detroit (Eminem) channels his rage into angry lyrics and hit songs, paving a way out of his tough hometown and giving him a shot at stardom. Sound familiar? Said to be loosely based on Eminem's own life, this feature-film debut of the controversial Grammy-winning artist is directed by Curtis Hanson ('Wonder Boys,' 'L.A. Confidential'). Kim Basinger co-stars as the rapper's mom, and Brittany Murphy plays his girlfriend.

Verdict :"8 Mile" is raw Eminem as you probably have never seen him before. A refreshing surprise was not only his acting abilites, but moreover his camera persona. Seemingly not phased by the lens, Eminem relates a story of 1995 Detroit in such a manner as to hint at what his own personal upbringing was like without touting the fact that he was portraying his prior life for us all to witness. This particular story takes place in a more, I guess you can call it, “realistic,” world with not a whole lot of sunshine in the setting and the situations. Where characters struggle with themselves and other people’s expectations of them at all times. Basically, 'white trash' and the 'ghetto' meet head to head here on a regular basis, but out of it comes forth a ray of shining hope for Jimmy Smith, aka 'Rabbit.' The scenes of “freestyling” at the Shelter - where a form of hip-hop poetry and raw emotion spew forth neverending spoken 'battles' - are some of the most passionate ever grouped together on the big screen. So intense, so real, Director Curtis Hanson's approach is quite incredible in itself and never quite allows the foot to come up off the gas peddle until the very last frame.







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