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6 Degrees Entertainment

'Skin'
(Sophie Okonedo, San Neill, Alice Krige, Tony Kgoroge, Ella Ramangwane, et al / DVD / R / (2008) 2011 / Entertainment One)

Overview: Despite being born to Afrikaner parents, Sandra faces prejudice from her community due to her dark skin and African features. Torn between her family and the man she loves, Sandra must overcome the racial intolerance of her society in this uplifting true story.

DVD Verdict: 'Skin' is the story of Sandra Laing (Sophie Okonedo), born black in the 1950's to white Afrikaners unaware of their black ancestry. Her parents, rural shopkeepers Abraham (Sam Neill) and Sannie (Alice Krige) who serve the local black community, lovingly raise her as their "white" little girl.

Still, at the age of ten, facing prejudice from her community due to her dark skin and African features, Sandra is driven out of her society. The film follows Sandra's 30-year odyssey from rejection to acceptance, betrayal to reconciliation, as she struggles to define her place in a changing world against countless obstacles.

Ms. Okonedo plays Sandra not as a symbol of black struggle in apartheid-era South Africa but as a determined woman attempting to discover her true self. As a mature woman and mother, her Sandra still looks to heal psychological wounds inflicted on her as a child. South Africa's Population Registration Act of 1950 required people to be identified, defined, classified, and separated by color, but in Sandra's home town, folks were less intolerant.

O'Neill's Abraham is sympathetic as he attempts to have the law changed so Sandra can be classified by heritage rather than appearance, but also reveals himself to have deep-seated racism. [MM] This is a Widescreen Presentation (2.35:1) enhanced for 16x9 TVs and comes with the Special Features of:

Behind-The-Scenes Featurette
Deleted Scenes
Outtakes
Script Development Workshops

www.entertainmentonegroup.com





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