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6 Degrees Entertainment

Movie Reviews
'Hitchcock'
(Anthony Hopkins, Helen Mirren, Scarlett Johansson, Jessica Biel, James D'Arcy, et al / PG-13 / 98 mins)

Overview: Director Sacha Gervasi adapts Stephen Rebello's book Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho to explore the relationship between the legendary British director (Anthony Hopkins) and his wife Alma Reville (Helen Mirren), who played a crucial behind-the-scenes role in the making of her husband's terrifying 1960 classic Psycho.

Verdict: The so-called "Master of Suspense" appears to have had some climactic revelations in his personal life with his wife, Alma Hitchcock, during the period when he produced the movie Psycho. The role of his wife is well-played by the amazing Helen Miren.

This movie postulates the theory that his wife played a pivotal role in most of Hitchcock's films, which seems plausible since she was in the moviemaking business before Hitchcock and was even his boss at one point.

The movie does do an eloquent job of outlining Hitchcock's transgressions with his "Hitchcock blonde" leading ladies and his infatuation with Vera Miles and Grace Kelly. The movie also gives us a glimpse at how prudish and prohibitive the movie industry and the U.S. government were during the late 1950s.

It's a miracle that Hitchcock was able to manage to produce such creative films during those restrictive times.





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