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6 Degrees Entertainment

'Secrets of Iconic British Estates'
(5-Disc DVD + Color Book / NR / 2014 / PBS)

Overview: 'Secrets of Iconic British Estates' is an intimate guide to four of Britain's most stunning, historic houses. This wonderful 5-DVD box-set also includes a beautiful hardcover book. Take a spectacular tour of four of Britain's most beautiful stately homes with this gorgeous DVD and book presentation from PBS.

Blu ray Verdict: In this downright INCREDIBLE 5-DVD and glossy, color book box-set, 'Secrets of Iconic British Estates' you get to visit Highclere Castle aka "Downton Abbey", Hampton Court Palace, Althorp and Chatsworth! Every single structure is full of history, architecture and interior design unmatched to any other.

What we learn:

Highclere Castle - Highclere Castle is a beautiful building and a warm, welcoming home to visitors and guests at events and celebrations held here. Apart from exploring the Castle, the Egyptian Exhibition fascinates adults and children, whilst the surrounding Grounds and Gardens provide peace and tranquility. And, when you visit, you will recognize many rooms from “Downton Abbey." You will see the Drawing Room in which Maggie Smith delivered many a withering comment to some unfortunate relation. In addition you can also find Tutankhamun in the cellars!

Hampton Court Palace - Hampton Court Palace is a royal palace in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, Greater London, in the historic county of Middlesex, and within the postal town East Molesey, Surrey; it has not been inhabited by the British Royal Family since the 18th century. It was originally built for Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, a favorite of King Henry VIII, circa 1514; in 1529, as Wolsey fell from favor, the palace was passed to the King, who enlarged it.Along with St. James's Palace, it is one of only two surviving palaces out of the many owned by King Henry VIII.

Althorp - Built in 1508 and set within 550 acres of walled parkland, Althorp has been the home of the Spencer family for 500 years. Today, Althorp contains one of the finest private collections of art, furniture and ceramics in the world, including numerous paintings by Rubens, Reynolds, Stubbs, Gainsborough and Van Dyck. Visitors are invited to explore the wonderful house, by guided tour, discovering beautiful interiors and one of Europe's finest private collections of furniture, pictures and ceramics.

Chatsworth - Chatsworth House is a stately home in Derbyshire, England. It is in the Derbyshire Dales, is the seat of the Duke of Devonshire and has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549. Standing on the east bank of the River Derwent, Chatsworth looks across to the low hills that divide the Derwent and Wye valleys. The house, set in expansive parkland and backed by wooded, rocky hills rising to heather moorland, contains a unique collection of priceless paintings, furniture, Old Master drawings, neoclassical sculptures, books and other artefacts. Chatsworth has been selected as the United Kingdom's favorite country house several times.

These are truly a grand scale creations of human beings with centuries of pride and tradition. Unbelievable feast for the eye from the manicured gardens to every single interior and exterior detail. Full of vibrant colors and life that only British can offer with centuries of dedication in creation and upkeep of such estates. This is a Widescreen Presentation (1.85:1) enhanced for 16x9 TVs.

www.PBS.org





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